E-learning & resources

HTMSE provides tailored courses covering a vast cross section of topics to a global network of professionals and stakeholders. Our online resources and publications provides educational material and information to professionals working in the counter human trafficking and modern slavery sector. Our training is provided my leading practitioners in their field.

Examples of training provided include:

  • Expert Witness training
  • Criminal law, forced criminality and non prosecution of victims of human trafficking
  • Immigration and public law
  • Housing and support
  • Compensation claim for victims of human trafficking
  • Modern slavery compliance and ethical supply chains for businesses
  • Law enforcement
  • Local Authority training
  • Training for health care professionals

 

If you are interested in tailored training courses, please email us at info@humantraffickingexperts.com to discuss your training needs.

The impact and consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on trafficked and exploited persons, OHCHR, June 2020

Special Rapporteur on trafficking in persons, Maria Grazia Giammarinaro produced the June 2020 report “The impact and consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on trafficked and exploited persons” tracking the impact of the Coronavirus pandemic on the most vulnerable communities.  

Most significantly, pre-existing vulnerabilities to trafficking have been exacerbated by the extreme social and economic impacts of the pandemic. These include: 

  • Poverty and unemployment
  • Migration, in changes in migration status, those on the migration journey and new restrictive migration policies
  • Lack of services provided to victims of trafficking and re-victimisation
  • The disruption of global supply chains
  • Trafficking and exploitation of children
  • Risks faced by victims and potential victims of sexual exploitation

The impact of the pandemic has negatively affected existing victims, as well as increasing the risk of others being preyed on by traffickers. It is clear that the COVID19 pandemic will have long term harmful impacts on exploited and trafficked persons, however the full impact is currently unfolding at yet to be determined. 

Find the June 2020 report on the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on trafficked and exploited persons here. https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/Trafficking/COVID-19-Impact-trafficking.pdf

National Referral Mechanism Statistics UK, 1st Quarter 2020 – January to March

The National Referral Mechanism (NRM) is the UK framework for identifying and referring potential victims of modern slavery and ensuring they receive the appropriate support. This statistical bulletin gives a summary and breakdown of the number of potential victims of modern slavery referred into the National Referral Mechanism from 1 January to 31 March 2020 (quarter 1).

Follow this link for the NRM Statistics UK, Quarter 1 2020 – January to March.

New Statutory Guidance on the Modern Slavery Act 2015

The Home Office has this week published statutory guidance under section 49(1) of the Modern Slavery Act 2015. The guidance covers indicators of trafficking, support, and the decision making process. The statutory guidance will replace a number of existing documents, namely:

  • Guidance: Duty to Notify the Home Office of potential victim of modern slavery
  • Victims of modern slavery: frontline staff guidance
  • Victims of modern slavery: competent authority guidance
  • Multi-Agency Assurance Panels Guidance

 

A link to the full guidance can be found here.

All-Party Parliamentary Group on Sport, Modern Slavery and Human Rights – Interim Report (July 2019)

In the summer the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Sport, Modern Slavery and Human Rights (APPG) released the first interim report presenting initial findings for the UK Government and legislative bodies. The report was commissioned in recognition of the central focus sport has within British culture and a recent increase in awareness of modern slavery and exploitation within the sporting sector – particularly in relation to mega sporting events.

The report has a broad remit in addressing the many varied issues that can arise in the sporting context, ranging from child protection concerns for young athletes through to issues of labour exploitation and forced labour in stadium construction and staffing of mega sporting events. Though addressing modern slavery the report addresses potential human rights abuses in the sporting context more broadly, including gender and race discrimination, suppression of free speech, and corporate responsibility.

The present report is an interim report and findings are subject to change with the final report. The full interim report can be found here.

HTMSE has previously analysed human trafficking and modern slavery in the sporting context. The full article can be found here.

An evaluation of Independent Child Trafficking Guardians – early adopter sites

Between February 2017 and July 2019 the UK Home Office, in partnership with the University of Bedford, conducted an evaluation of the Independent Child Trafficking Guardians service in three early adopter sites; namely, Greater Manchester, Wales and Hampshire. The Independent Child Trafficking Guardians were established by section 48 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015, and are designed to be advocates for all child victims of human trafficking, acting as an independent source of advice and holding a position where they can speak up on their behalf.  The evaluation sought to address the question of what the ‘added value’ is of Independent Child Trafficking Guardians service, whether this varied across different groups of children, and whether there was any difference between the early adopter sites.

The evaluation involved the collection and analysis of data from both qualitative and quantitative sources from three core data sets:

  1. Data collected by the children’s charity Barnardo’s on the work carried out by the Independent Child Trafficking Guardians. Barnardo’s is the Independent Child Trafficking Guardians service provider.
  2. Data collected from local authorities and social services.
  3. National Referral Mechanism data on decisions, and the timeliness of determinations, in Independent Child Trafficking Guardians sites in comparison with the rest of England and Wales.

The evaluation found that 23% of children referred to the Independent Child Trafficking Guardians service went missing at some stage, though for the most part this was only on a temporary basis, and the Independent Child Trafficking Guardians service would continue to engage with other agencies for six months after a child went missing before closing their case. The evaluation also found children engaged with the Independent Child Trafficking Guardians service for a period of six months or more initially saw a decrease in the likelihood of their going missing, though this likelihood would subsequently begin to rise again. Finally, the most common reason for children exiting the Independent Child Trafficking Guardians service is turning 18. The Independent Child Trafficking Guardians is only for children under the age of 18 and the evaluation notes several concerns by support providers surrounding the management of transitioning individuals from child to adult support services. The full report can be found here.